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BURMA PEACE PROCESS: Will “Big Nine” meeting make a difference?

BURMA PEACE PROCESS: Will “Big Nine” meeting make a difference?

It is a belated invitation, but nevertheless, a welcome move that President Thein Sein asked for the gathering and holding a meeting, on 31 October, between representatives of the government, parliament, military and political parties.

 

Re: The peace process: The iron is still hot

Re: The peace process: The iron is still hot

It is true that the "iron is still hot", as pointed out by the SHAN Editorial. But the matter is, it is cooling fast and both sides, the USDP-Military Regime and the Ethnic Armed Organizations (EAO), should take into account.

Does the Shan Word ‘Death’ Tell Us?!

Does the Shan Word ‘Death’ Tell Us?!

I. Introduction!

‘…the Shan is a Buddhist when he is well and animist when he is ill’, this is a statement made by (James Haxton) Telford, a scholar who had studied animism in Burma. He further comments that despite the fact that Shan have been converted to Buddhism for centuries, the breakaway from animism was never completed (Telford: 1937). To some degree, his statement is still relevant to most Shan Buddhists today. They celebrate religious ceremonies lavishly all year round in their happy days. But in times of ailing, they are busy with animistic ways, such as, consulting the shaman, searching for khwan (ၶႂၼ်/ၽၼ်) (soul), incantation candle etc until it becomes difficult for outsiders to differentiate between Buddhism and animism. This is partly due to the fact that the Shan have embraced Buddhism and some animism beliefs have been redefined to fit into new religious context.

BURMA PEACE PROCESS: Failing to secure negotiated surrender government falls back on “Plan B”

BURMA PEACE PROCESS: Failing to secure negotiated surrender government falls back on “Plan B”

Within a week, four recent interviews, three with Nationwide Ceasefire Coordination Team (NCCT) top negotiators and one with union parliamentarian, U Hla Swe, who has attended the Myanmar Peace Center (MPC) meeting in Rangoon, would likely be a barometer, indicating which way the political wind is blowing and whether the ongoing peace process will be stalled altogether.

Peace process in limbo, when ceasefire is a joke

Peace process in limbo, when ceasefire is a joke

Col Sao Swy Mangrai, Shan State Progress Party/Shan State Army (SSPP/SSA), was asked during a meeting, “How’s the ceasefire going?” In response, he stretched out his arms like he was holding a gun and said, “Like this. Cease! (releases the trigger and lowers the gun) Fire! (raises the gun and squeezes the trigger). Cease! Fire! Cease! Fire!”

Harder to win than war -Day 5

Harder to win than war -Day 5

Day Five: Sunday, 5 October 2014

Today, before leaving for the airport, we visit the Wat Phra Kaew (Emerald Buddha Temple) and Wat Arun (Temple of Dawn).

At Wat Phra Kaew, visitors as usual are thick, almost swarming all over each other. Many of them these days are Chinese, prompting temple officials to use more Chinese than English in communicating with the tourists.

Peace process: Breaking the deadlock

Peace process: Breaking the deadlock

One evening more than 30 years ago, when I got back home, I asked my wife what we had for dinner. She said fish and I was happy because one of the meals I have always enjoyed is rice with fish. But then I found out that there was only one fish and not a very big one at that. If I was to have my way, my wife would end up eating her rice with a sprinkle of fish and if we agreed to go half, I would not be eating much either, as a fish head is something that I have never liked.

Harder to win than war -Day 4

Harder to win than war -Day 4

Day Four. Saturday, 4 October 2014

Ask me who’s the Shan misunderstood most by other Shans and I’ll lose no time in pointing out at Harn Yawnghwe, born Sao Hso Harn Fa, the youngest son of Sao Shwe Thaike and Sao Hearn Hkam of the princely house of Yawnghwe. (Interestingly, his namesake, King Hso Harn Fa, pronounced Tho Han Bwa by the Burmese, who ruled Ava, 1527-1542, is also the most hated Shan sovereign for reputedly killing 300 Burmese monks. Burmese history in the meanwhile has only praise for the Burmese king Alaungpaya who was said to have put to death 3,000 Mon monks in 1757.)

Harder to win than war -Day 3

Harder to win than war -Day 3

Day Three. Thursday, 3 October 2014

This morning the SSPP announces that due to heavy bombardment by the Burma Army, its units have withdrawn from Ta Pha Sawng, prompting the meeting to send a joint open petition to the President.

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Shan Drug Watch Newsletters

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Last of the breed: life of a Shan prince (Part One)  Renowned Australian journalist Phil Thornton interviewed Sao Hso Hom, son of Sao Sam Tun, late Prince of Mongpawn and

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