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BURMA PEACE PROCESS: Differing Concepts, Choice of Words and Multi-Track System Approach

BURMA PEACE PROCESS: Differing Concepts, Choice of Words and Multi-Track System Approach

By: Sai Wansai
Monday, 28 July 2014

Choice of Words or Conceptual Differences

News coming out, sporadically from Laiza, where ethnic leaders are meeting to iron out their positions, indicates that the choice of words, or should we say conceptual differences, are still hard to bridge, which is essential to formulate the Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement (NCA).

 

Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement (NCA): Should there be a parallel process?

Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement (NCA): Should there be a parallel process?

During the visit by political parties to Chiang Mai on 14 July, a number of the politicians had voiced their dissatisfaction with the ongoing peace process. To them, the first stage of the peace roadmap which includes the NCA negotiations, Framework for Political Dialogue (FPD) negotiations and Political Dialogue (PD) has taken too long. “How soon do you think the political parties and civil society organizations (CSOs) can hitch our wagons to it?” asked one.

Show Time: Evaluating Burma’s 15 year master plan to eradicate opium

Show Time: Evaluating Burma’s 15 year master plan to eradicate opium

Afterword: The show must go on

It was Chao Tzang Yawnghwe (1939-2004), Shan’s most famous and respected scholar-resistance leader, who coined the word “Hollywoodization”: depiction of the War on Drugs as a dual between police and gangsters, in Burma’s case, government (“the good”) and rebels (“the bad”) which blurs the reality on the ground. The outcome, as can be expected, is that the fight for ethnic and state rights of the non-Burmans, in the mind of outsiders, is overshadowed by the War on Drugs. The non-Burmans’ fight for their rights as human beings was a lost cause right from the start, not unlike the US southern states’ struggle for state rights being obscured by the slave question, during its civil war.

Show Time: Evaluating Burma’s 15 year master plan to eradicate opium

Show Time: Evaluating Burma’s 15 year master plan to eradicate opium

Civilians taking matter into own hands

The new government has formed anti-drugs campaign committees right from village level. But except in areas where the people have taken the drug issue into their own hands, there is little progress reported in the fight.

Show Time: Evaluating Burma’s 15 year master plan to eradicate opium

Show Time: Evaluating Burma’s 15 year master plan to eradicate opium

Naw Kham’s case: Lost in translation again!

Thursday, 20 September 2012 13:51 S.H.A.N.

Following his trial in September 2012, SHAN wrote the following article — Editor

One thing very clear that comes out of the CCTV’s reports on “Godfather” Naw Kham, who together with 5 colleagues are on trial today in Kunming, Yunnan province, is that he has yet to admit to the murder charges leveled at him and his gang.

PEACE OR WAR IN BURMA

PEACE OR WAR IN BURMA

Whether there will be peace or war in Burma, depends totally on the Burmese dictatorial regime, which has one of the biggest and strongest armed forces in S.E Asia. Both the army and the Thein Sein government are accountable to the generals, who claim absolute power over other ethnic nationalities' homelands, people and their resources.

Show Time: Evaluating Burma’s 15 year master plan to eradicate opium

Show Time: Evaluating Burma’s 15 year master plan to eradicate opium

Government’s poppy destruction drive: A case study

Lt-Gen Ko Ko, Chairman of Central Committee for Drug Abuse Control (CCDAC), had told SDW in June 2013 that dealing with opium production involved roughly 2 stages: destruction of poppy fields and crop substitution. “The first stage is easy but the second is not, because we need a lot of resources especially funds,” he said. “We tried the first stage in Panglawng (spelled and pronounced by non-Shans as Pinlaung) one time and ended up by begging for rice donations for the farmers whose fields we had destroyed.”

A leader revisited

A leader revisited

It has been 23 years since he passed away of cancer on 11 July 1991. I had followed him for 20 years.

In 1998, with donations from friends and former followers, I renovated his tomb on the border which since then has been a place for reflection as well as a destination for visitors far and near.

Understanding Burma’s Peace Process: Learning it the easy way

Understanding Burma’s Peace Process: Learning it the easy way

The 26 page paper written by Dr Min Zaw Oo of the Myanmar Peace Center (MPC) that came out after the first draft of the Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement (NCA) in April is, I think, a real treasure trove.

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Last of the breed: life of a Shan prince (Part One)  Renowned Australian journalist Phil Thornton interviewed Sao Hso Hom, son of Sao Sam Tun, late Prince of Mongpawn and

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