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Let us Stage another Saya San Revolution

Let us Stage another Saya San Revolution

More than half a century of military dictatorship to be exact since March 2nd 1962, there have been several sporadic outburst against the ruling Junta starting from 7th July 1962 but the major ones that shakes the government was the 8888 Democracy Uprising and the Saffron Revolution of 2007. The students of 1988 and the monks of 2007 have all made supreme sacrifices for the country and people and now it is the turn of the peasants of Burma to show to the world that they are also nationalists and love the country. With so much land grabbing by the Tatmadaw and the companies owned by the cronies backed by the international companies and multilateral corporations of the West and China, it is time for the peasants and the working people to rise up against this unfair system and demonstrate to the world that Burma is owned by the people of Burma and that the people are the masters of their own fate and maker of their own destiny. The peasants who formed the majority of the population of Burma to be exact more than 70% of the people live in the country side has been a major political force since time immemorial and has a precedent of uprising  in the 1930s.
Saya San(ဆရာစံ) Peasants Uprising

 

BURMA PEACE PROCESS: Rejoicing prematurely or back to the square one?

BURMA PEACE PROCESS: Rejoicing prematurely or back to the square one?

Now that the Thein Sein regime has accepted the use of the word “Federal” in the Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement (NCA) and even vowed to implement it to transform the country into a federal union, it seems the main stumbling block has been removed in its negotiation for a peaceful, political settlement with the Nationwide Ceasefire Coordinating Team (NCCT), an umbrella organization of the some 16 ethnic armed groups.

Decentralization or Co-opting Ethnonationalism: 8 States or 14 States and Regions?

Lately, the question of whether 8 States or 14 States and Regions should be used for the equitable power-sharing solution, in rebuilding a genuine federal union, has rear its head and come up again, as a main sticking point for the fusion of Shan Nationalities League for Democracy (SNLD) and Shan Nationalities Democratic Party (SNDP), the two Shan political parties.

Spokesperson: More than a presentation

Spokesperson: More than a presentation

In 1980, I was appointed as a liaison officer-cum-spokesperson for the Shan United Revolutionary Army (SURA). Unlike today, there wasn’t any training for the job at that time. Fortunately, there were two people who advised me how I should do my job.

Uprooting Insurgency

Uprooting Insurgency

Review

Uprooting Insurgency

General Staff College

The document, which was among others that fell into the hands of the Shan State Army (SSA) two years earlier, gives the reader a fresh look at the 69 years old armed forces of Burma that calls itself the Tatmadaw.

From Princes to Persecuted: A Condensed history of the Shan/Tai to 1962

From Princes to Persecuted: A Condensed history of the Shan/Tai to 1962

By Dr Shona T.S. Goodman
With foreword by Harn Yawnghwe
Printed by Createspace, an Amazon.com company (2014)

Book Review

If there is one thing that never fails to draw my attention, it is a book--a new one -- about Shans. Even though I would like to think that I knew everything I needed to know about them. And fortunately every book teaches me something new, including this latest 132 page booklet that was presented to me a few days back.

The Importance of the “Federal Army” Question

The Importance of the “Federal Army” Question

Matthew J Walton

The prospects for a nationwide ceasefire in Myanmar depend on the different sides being able to overcome not simply hostility and mistrust, but fundamentally different ideological conceptions of the political structure in Myanmar and the role of the armed forces within it. One persistent point of disagreement concerns the military’s structure: the Tatmadaw says that there can only be a single “Union Army” while ethnic groups insist on the need for a “Federal Union Army.” There is room for compromise, but a solution will likely have to look beyond the present ceasefire moment and consider the implications for long-term ethnic reconciliation across Myanmar.

BURMA PEACE PROCESS: Differing Concepts, Choice of Words and Multi-Track System Approach

BURMA PEACE PROCESS: Differing Concepts, Choice of Words and Multi-Track System Approach

By: Sai Wansai
Monday, 28 July 2014

Choice of Words or Conceptual Differences

News coming out, sporadically from Laiza, where ethnic leaders are meeting to iron out their positions, indicates that the choice of words, or should we say conceptual differences, are still hard to bridge, which is essential to formulate the Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement (NCA).

Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement (NCA): Should there be a parallel process?

Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement (NCA): Should there be a parallel process?

During the visit by political parties to Chiang Mai on 14 July, a number of the politicians had voiced their dissatisfaction with the ongoing peace process. To them, the first stage of the peace roadmap which includes the NCA negotiations, Framework for Political Dialogue (FPD) negotiations and Political Dialogue (PD) has taken too long. “How soon do you think the political parties and civil society organizations (CSOs) can hitch our wagons to it?” asked one.

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Funding Notice f

Shan Drug Watch Newsletters

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Last of the breed: life of a Shan prince (Part One)  Renowned Australian journalist Phil Thornton interviewed Sao Hso Hom, son of Sao Sam Tun, late Prince of Mongpawn and

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